Parents having a hard time finding HPV vaccines

Filed under: Your Pregnancy, Health & Safety: Babies, Development/Milestones: Babies, Day Care & Education

Many parents who are hoping to get the much anticipated and newly approved vaccine that helps to prevent cervical cancer are experiencing frustration in either locating the drug or getting their insurance companies to pay for it. The vaccine, which helps to prevent strains of the sexually transmitted disease human papilloma virus, or HPV, from developing into cervical cancer, has been hailed as a medical breakthrough in the medical community. However, because of the novelty of the medication not many insurance companies have approved coverage. The process involves a series of three shots with a price tag of $360 for the series.

Over 6 million Americans are diagnosed with HPV every year; however since cervical cancer is the result, mostly women are effected by the disease. The popularity of the advertising campaign has made it one of the most sought after vaccines of all time. Many parents are anxious to have their daughters vaccinated to help prevent a future occurrence of cervical cancer. Most doctors are encouraging families to wait until the new calendar year in hopes that the insurance companies will provide coverage by then.

As I mentioned in a post yesterday, this is a hot topic among parents right now. It brings up family values and promiscuity. It also brings to light that an ounce of prevention can save a life later on down the road. For some families the family values issues will likely deter them from having their children vaccinated. For others, perhaps the cost will be an obstacle. I hope that someday, sooner rather than later, this vaccine will be available for about $10 at the public health clinics just like many others are. I hope it will become as common place as the measles,mumps and rubella vaccinations and that all little girls will receive this shot.

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Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.