Weighing in on baby scales

Filed under: Babies, Toddlers Preschoolers, Nutrition: Health, Work Life, Life & Style

Now that Tom Cruise shelled out for that fancy sonogram machine, everyone and their monkey will be making domestic versions of equipment normally reserved for doctor's offices and hospitals. Daysitter, the new blog from Cookie Magazine, is promoting the Weigh-to-Grow Child's Scale, which is intended for home use. They feel it's a great product, especially for preemies.

Though I have very little experience with preemies, I happen to disagree. As a mom of a boy who is constantly teetering on the minimum weight line on the growth scale, I think this product would make me more of a spaz. You'll get to know soon enough how easily freaked out I can get. (Duh, they roll their eyes, it's called being a mom!) I find myself constantly worrying about what he's eating -- or rather, not eating -- after every trip to the pediatrician.

My son decided early on that he was a vegetarian. I'm talking like 13 months old. He can live for days on Goldfish crackers and yogurt. I slave for hours, trying new recipes to entice him to no avail. I get particularly stressed out on days when I've worked at the office. Rush home in traffic, pick him up at daycare before the 6 PM deadline, and attempt to make a healthy dinner that everyone will enjoy, only to have the little bug throw it in my face -- literally! I often end up muttering, "Mommy has to go to work to put food on the table... food that you're not going to eat anyway, so what's the point?"

At 22 months, Nate is stuck at 23 pounds. Nolan could easily take him in a fight. If I had this scale at home, I would be weighing Nate morning, noon and night trying to figure out which meals seem to pack on the ounces. Like I need more to add to the wiping bums and noses task list.

What's your opinion on the home scale? Helpful or stressful?

Many thanks to Tamara at Daysitter for the tip!

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AdviceMama Says:
Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.