Is your child's music parental-controlled?

Filed under: Just For Moms, Big Kids, Just For Dads, Development/Milestones: Babies, Gadgets

Ellie and I both love music and we share my iPod. Together, we created a playlist of her favorite songs and we rock out most days on our way home from school. Since she graduated from what she calls "baby songs", we have found that our taste in music is fairly compatible. I often share with her songs I like and many end up on her playlist of favorites as well.

I remember as a child being told by my mother that every song tells a story. This prompted me to really start listening to the words of songs, instead of just the music. Knowing the words to songs didn't always mean that I understood what they meant. As a child, I could sing every word of Afternoon Delight, but I didn't have a clue that the song was about having sex in the afternoon.

Which is why my husband and I are at odds over the music Ellie listens to. He feels that the stories that some songs tell are too mature for her to hear. He thinks music, like television, should be parental-controlled. I agree with him on some level because there is a lot of popular music that is blatantly violent or sexual. But a lot of songs, even if they are about sex and love, are over Ellie's head. Unlike television, which gives you an image to go along with the words, music lets you make up your own pictures. When I would listen to Afternoon Delight, I imagined a delightful afternoon. I heard the other words, but since I didn't understand their meaning, I created my own, innocent story.

Ellie's current favorite song is Shakira's Objection (Tango). To me, the song tells a story about a woman who is angry about a love triangle from which she can't seem to break free. Ellie thinks the song is about tango dancing. I think this proves my point.

What about you? Do you worry about the lyrics of the songs your little ones are listening to?

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AdviceMama Says:
Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.