Hockey fight camp for kids

Filed under: Teens, Health & Safety: Babies, That's Entertainment

As a teenager, I was really in to hockey. Actually, I was in to hockey players, but I also enjoyed the game itself. My best friend lived within walking distance of an ice rink and we spent countless afternoons perched in the bleachers watching the Houston Aeros practice.

I am not a fan of violence and the fighting in hockey eventually turned me off of the game. But for many fans, the body slams and punches are what makes hockey exciting. And while some are calling for fighting to be banned in the National Hockey League, others say it is an integral part of the game.

Whether or not fighting should be tolerated in hockey is debatable. I don't want to see fights, so I don't go. But when you start teaching young kids how to injure their hockey opponents, that is a different story. But that is exactly what Derek "the Boogeyman" Boogard, a player for the Minnesota Wild, is doing. His one-day hockey camp costs $40 and instead of teaching his 12 to 18-year-old students the finer points of the game, he is teaching them how to brutally attack players on the other team. He claims he is teaching them self-defense, yet students receive t-shirts splashed with fake blood while watching video replays of Boogard crushing another player's cheekbone. And then he teaches them how to do that themselves.

Parents clearly support this brutality, otherwise they wouldn't be enrolling their children in this camp. In any other sport, teaching children to be unsportsmanlike and violent would be considered shocking. Why is it accepted in the game of hockey?
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AdviceMama Says:
Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.
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