O.J.' s book: Why the Goldmans published it

Filed under: Just For Dads, Siblings, Celeb Parents, That's Entertainment

Back in August, I wrote about the Goldman family and their decision to publish the book written by O.J. Simpson about the murders of his ex-wife Nicole and her friend Ronald Goldman. The book, titled If I Did It, is a supposedly fictional account of how O.J. Simpson would have murdered them, you know, had he actually done it.

Some people have wondered how the Goldmans could justify publishing - and making money from - a book written by the man they believe killed their son. The book, retitled If I Did It: Confessions of the Killer, was released yesterday and Goldman's father Fred and sister Kim appeared on the Oprah Winfrey show to talk about why they published it.

"It's sending him a message," Kim Goldman said. "He put hours putting together this confession about how he killed Ron and Nicole, and he worked hard thinking he was going to make millions off of it. And we snatched it right out from under him."

Winfrey has acknowledged that she thinks the book is 'despicable' and had originally intended Nicole's sister, Denise Brown, be on the show with the Goldman's. Brown backed out, refusing to share the stage with them, telling Oprah she didn't want to give the book "more impact." She goes on to call the Goldmans hypocrites for changing their minds about publishing the book, which they themselves originally found "disgusting" and "despicable."

"I felt the same way. I stood my ground on that," Brown said. "I still don't believe it should be published. I think it is a morally wrong thing to do."

I tend to agree with Brown here. I feel sorry for the Goldman's and their apparent inability to move on with their lives after the murder of their son. But taking the rights to publish the book away from O.J. Simpson did prevent him from profiting from it. What purpose does publishing it serve?

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