What kind of helicopter parent are you?

Filed under: Teens, Day Care & Education

Are you a helicopter parent? A recent study found that as many as 60% of parents with college-aged children qualify -- so, odds are, the answer is yes.

The Wall Street Journal recently separated these highly (and possibly overly) involved parents into five distinct groups. Check them out to see if any of these descriptions sound familiar.

1. The Blackhawk Parent: this is the mom or dad that tries to solve all of their kids' problems by picking a fight with whoever is in charge. Remember, just because your son or daughter doesn't get the class schedule they were hoping for, you don't necessarily need to start calling the university president.

2. The Toxic Parent: whether they know it or not, these parents treat their children like they're stupid -- either by making personal decisions for them, or monitoring them so closely that they never have a chance to learn from their mistakes.

3. The Consumer Advocate: these parents demand the most from their money -- which isn't always a bad thing. While they certainly get on the nerves of college officials, they'll make sure their child is getting every opportunity their tuition provides.

4. The Safety Expert: every mom or dad wants to know their child is safe, but these parents want to know every single detail about how a university plans to protect their son or daughter -- even though, in the event of a crisis, the parent will most-likely be hundreds (or thousands) of miles away.

5. The Traffic and Rescue Helicopters: some parents give advice and guidance, but let their children make decisions -- only coming to the rescue when there's a problem. This sounds fairly sane, but be careful -- rush in too quickly, and you'll be like the Toxic Parent who never let's their kid learn how to weather tough times.

Recognize yourself anywhere on that list?

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AdviceMama Says:
Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.
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As AOL continues to grow and evolve we are taking necessary actions to ensure our efforts and resources are
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