Birth control prices may drop for college students

Filed under: Your Pregnancy, Health & Safety: Babies, In The News, Day Care & Education

Back in March, I wrote about a change in the Medicaid laws that had the unintended consequence of making it more difficult for prescription drug makers to provide discounts on contraceptives to college health centers. As a result, prices for birth control have soared and many college students can no longer afford them. In some cases, the costs have risen from $15 a month to as much as $53 since the changes went into effect in January.

Last week, Rep Joseph Crowley (D-NY) and 103 co-sponsors introduced the 'Prevention Through Affordable Access Act' that will address this problem not only for college students, but for those who are served by low-income clinics. The act would once again allow pharmaceutical companies to sell birth control to college health clinics as well as other safety-net providers such as Planned Parenthood at a reduced price.

"A bureaucratic mistake should not stand in the way of protecting the health and safety of hard-working women," Crowley says. "My colleagues, who are interested in effectively preventing unintended pregnancies, ought to support this measure and join us in urging its immediate passage."

I happen to agree with this and not just because I have a 25-year-old college student daughter. It was not the intention of Congress to make birth control unaffordable for college students and low-income women and I think the the error should have been rectified by now. Read more about the Act here.
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AdviceMama Says:
Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.
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