Breast-feeding at an all time high

Filed under: Newborns, Just For Moms, Babies, Your Pregnancy, In The News, Expert Advice: Toddlers & Preschoolers, Nutrition: Toddlers & Preschoolers, Development/Milestones: Babies, Research Reveals: Toddlers & Preschoolers, Gear Guides: Toddlers & Preschoolers, Gear Guides: Babies, Activities: Toddlers & Preschoolers, Behavior: Toddlers & Preschoolers, Development: Toddlers & Preschoolers, Health & Safety: Toddlers & Preschoolers, Expert Advice: Babies, Toddlers Preschoolers, Baby-sitting, Feeding & Sleeping, Day Care & Education, Health & Safety: Babies, Research Reveals: Babies

According to a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, new moms who do not breast-feed are now in the minority. The report released yesterday reveals that 77 percent of newborn babies are breast-fed, at least for a little while. This is up from 60% for the period 1993-1994.

The numbers are based on in-person interviews and physical examinations of 434 mothers and infants during 2005 and 2006. Breaking down the numbers by race, the most significant rise in breast-feeding rates were found in black mothers, who historically have had lower than average numbers. During that 1993-1994 period, only 36 percent of African-American babies were breast-fed. That number has now risen to 65 percent.

"It was very impressive that when it comes to beginning to breast-feed, African-American women have had the greatest progress," says U.S. Surgeon General Dr. David Satcher.

For Mexican-American mothers, 80 percent now report breast-feeding their babies - up from 67 percent. For white moms, the numbers rose from 62 percent to 79 percent. The lowest rates for breast-feeding were found in unmarried, poor, rural and young mothers under 20 who have a high school education or less.

Experts attribute the rising numbers of breast-feeding moms to education campaigns and a changing culture that is more accepting and accommodating of nursing mothers.
AOL Answers is no longer available
AOL Answers is closed

AOL Answers is no longer available.

As AOL continues to grow and evolve we are taking necessary actions to ensure our efforts and resources are
focused on the areas where we can create the maximum amount of value for our loyal consumer base. As a result
we have decided to sunset AOL Answers. Thank you for your participation in this site. If you have an AOL-related
question (passwords, account information, etc.), please visit our AOL Help site at help.aol.com.

ReaderComments (Page 1 of 1)

FollowUs

Flickr RSS

TheTalkies

AskAdviceMama

AdviceMama Says:
Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.
AOL Answers is no longer available
AOL Answers is closed

AOL Answers is no longer available.

As AOL continues to grow and evolve we are taking necessary actions to ensure our efforts and resources are
focused on the areas where we can create the maximum amount of value for our loyal consumer base. As a result
we have decided to sunset AOL Answers. Thank you for your participation in this site. If you have an AOL-related
question (passwords, account information, etc.), please visit our AOL Help site at help.aol.com.