Sasha and Malia - New Home, Same Rules

Filed under: In The News, Celeb Kids

Think First Daughters Sasha and Malia Obama will be waited on hand and foot in their new digs? Ha.

According to the new issue of PEOPLE, the rules are the same in the White House as they were in their home in Chicago.

Sasha, 10, and Malia, 7, are expected to make their own beds, keep their bedrooms spic-and-span and clean up after dinner. And although their grandmother, Marian Robinson, 71, is living in a third-floor guest room to assist the family, the girls are not allowed to take advantage of Grandma's help.

Malia and Sasha Obama

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    Sasha Obama runs down the colonnade as she returns from a February 2009 weekend visit to Chicago with her father, President Barack Obama, to the White House.

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    Sasha Obama back in DC after a weekend visit to Chicago.

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    US President Barack Obama, his wife Michelle, daughters Malia and Sasha, and mother-in-law Marian Robinson walk across the tarmac to board Air Force One at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. Obama and his family were returning to Washington after spending the weekend in Chicago.

    Mandel Ngan, AFP/Getty

    The First Family walks down the stairs from Air Force One upon they arrival at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on February 2009.

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    Sasha and Dad Take in a Show
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    Malia and Sasha's Excellent Adventure
    Malia, 10 (right) and Sasha, 7, wave to the crowd at the 2008 election night rally in Chicago. Politics are child's play to these sweethearts, and we can't wait to see them come into their own.

    Jae C. Hong, AP

    Sasha and Malia, kissing her mother Michelle, get ready for the first day of school in Washington, DC, as President-elect looks on. The Obama family are staying at the Hay Adams Hotel prior to their move into the White House.

    Callie Shell, HO / Change.gov



Michelle Obama has even asked the White House staff not to dote on the girls. "People want to make your life easy, and when you have small kids -- I've explained this to the staff -- they don't need their lives to be easy. They're kids," she says.

However, the girls can roam all around the White House and even hang in the Oval Office whenever they want. "I've tried to encourage them to feel like this whole place is their home," says the First Lady. "We actually had this conversation -- just let us know where you're going."

And if the girls need more tips on life at the historic mansion, they can always rely on former First Twins, Jenna and Barbara Bush, who passed on a few pointers on life in the "magical" kingdom. "Slide down the banister of the solarium, go to T-ball games, have swimming parties..." Or, in Sasha and Malia's case, dust the banisters, wash your play clothes and put away the pool noodles. Kidding.

What do you think of the Obama's parenting style? Are they setting appropriate boundaries, or are they too tough on those girls?

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Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.