Parents Play Key Role In Preventing Smoking, Study Says

Filed under: In The News, Alcohol & Drugs, Research Reveals: Teens

mom and daughter

Parents can keep teens from smoking. Credit: Getty Images

Kids whose parents keep tabs on them and set strong limits are less likely to become habitual smokers, according to a new study.

Of 270 teenagers studied, 58 percent of them had a daily smoking habit by the time they reached 12th grade, and researchers found that their decision to start smoking was influenced by both peers and parents, according to a story published by Reuters.

However, kids whose parents had a "positive family management style" of reasonable discipline, involvement and rewarding good behavior were 31 percent less likely to make smoking a daily habit.

Kids whose parents smoked and had a more relaxed management style were 71 percent more likely to smoke.

"We found that parents play an important role in preventing teens' smoking escalation from experimental to daily smoking," Dr. Min Jung Kim, of the University of Washington in Seattle, told Reuters.

Kim said parents always have an influence over their children, and that they should be careful to set limits and expectations. Moms and dads who smoke should quit, and parents should shoot for "effective supervision and appropriate punishment or rewards for children's behavior," she said.

Would you quit smoking to prevent your kids from picking up the habit?



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AdviceMama Says:
Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.
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