Avoiding Viagra, Cialis Ads Not as Hard as It Used to Be

Filed under: In The News

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Some parents want to avoid the big embarrassment of discussing the little blue pill. Credit: Toby Talbot, AP

Parents who get all hot and bothered when their little ones see commercials for erectile dysfunction drugs can take a little blue chill pill.

Media watchdog the Parents Television Council (PTC) announced this week that it will publish a weekly schedule of slated air times for Viagra and Cialis ads -- with that information provided by the drug makers themselves -- giving parents the info they need to avoid the ads entirely.

The PTC monitors entertainment choices in order to tell parents what it feels is and is not appropriate for children to watch. In February, the group expressed concern that radio superstar Howard Stern would become the new host of "American Idol." In August, it sent letters asking advertisers to boycott the new sitcom "$#*! My Dad Says." This week, it called out Miley Cyrus for being to too sexy in her new music video.

But the PTC is not alone in its dislike of the erectile dysfunction ads, which typically feature men and women considering coital activity. In September, the American Academy of Pediatricians issued a statement suggesting commercials for ED pills should only air after 10 p.m., because of their often sexually explicit content.

So when do these ads pop up?

A quick perusal of the schedules posted on the PTC's website indicate that Pfizer, makers of Viagra, tend to stick with sports, news and late night shows such as "Nightline" and the various network talk shows. Eli Lilly, maker of Cialis, tends to do the same, with the exception of a single ad on the Oct. 14 airing of the CBS series "The Mentalist." Viewers of "The Tonight Show" get ads for Viagra, while Cialis checks in during NASCAR. Both companies buy time during NFL football games.

Cialis ads also are scheduled to air during the upcoming Major League Baseball playoffs, so consider yourselves warned. Explaining the infield fly rule to a second grader is tough enough. Who wants to explain what the guy on TV means when says he wants to be "ready anytime"?

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AdviceMama Says:
Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.