Teen Gives Her Last $100 So Needy Children Can Have Christmas Gifts

Filed under: Holidays, In The News


A Pennsylvania teen spent her Christmas money to ensure other kids have gifts under the tree. Credit: Corbis

Teenagers are so materialistic, so self-absorbed, so self-centered, so ...

Hold the stereotypes.

You've never met Kyia Taylor. The 15-year-old girl donated the last $100 of her Christmas money to give toys to needy children.

WJAC-TV, the NBC affiliate in Johnstown, Pa., reports Taylor was eating at Ryan's restaurant in Richland Township (about seven miles southeast of Johnstown) when she saw a Christmas tree decorated with paper ornaments. The ornaments were Christmas wish lists from impoverished children.

Taylor plucked a couple of ornaments to pitch in, but seeing so many lonely looking bits of paper hanging from the tree, she decided to give all the money she possibly could.

"It's sad the way little kids have to put their names on trees in order to ask for stuff for Christmas," Taylor tells WJAC-TV. "I sat down and cried on my mother's shoulder because (of seeing) little kids ask for stuff."

The tree is project part of the Alternative Community Resources Program and has been an annual feature at the Richland Township restaurant for the past five years.

"There are good children out there and ... they are thinking from the heart and truly have the Christmas spirit," program spokesperson Beverly Bender tells the TV station.

Taylor tells WJAC-TV she just couldn't bear the idea of little children waking up to no presents on Christmas morning.

"Little kids want to look under their trees on Christmas morning and say, 'Santa came!' Those little kids, they just want to look under the tree and see something for them," she tells the station.

Taylor adds that her big Christmas wish is that she had more money to buy gifts for more children.

Another customer raised $200 for the tree. However, Greg Shroyer, the restaurant's hospitality manager, tells WJAC-TV it's particularly heartwarming to see a teenager give all she can.

"It's pretty outstanding to see that kids want to take it on their own to better the lives (of those) that don't have it," he tells the station.
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Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.
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