Kneel Before Zod? Most Parents Aren't That Strict, According to Test

Filed under: In The News, Childcare, Behavior, Research Reveals

strict parents

You may think they're mean but it turns out, most parents aren't that strict. Credit: Getty Images

"Kneel before Zod!"

Say what you will about his plans to kill Superman and take over the world, you have to hand it General Zod. He was very clear about his parenting style.

He's what you may call an "authoritarian" parent. Not like that namby-pamby Jonathan Kent who adopted Superman as infant.

He was the very model of the "permissive" parent, with with all his love, care and praise for young Clark. Maybe what you need is a blend between Jonathan Kent and General Zod.

Like Jor-El.

Superman's birth father clearly loved his son but set boundaries and rules. (None of that interfering with human history or spinning the Earth backwards on its axis.)

This is the "authoritative" style of parenting -- and is possibly the most popular among us earthlings.

Queendom.com of Canada, which offers personality assessments on the Internet, just released the results of its Parenting Style Test. Most parents aspire to be Jor-El. They don't want their children to kneel before them. But they do want them to clean their rooms.

More than 1,000 parents took the style test, and according to a press release posted on PR.com, the vast majority of them said they preferred the authoritative mode of child rearing. This was true across the age spectrum.

It was even true among participants who didn't actually have children. However, those people tended to be a bit delusional, according to the press release. They envisioned themselves as the superhero parents -- buying only expensive organic baby food, staying involved in all their children's activities and shielding them from the influences of pop culture.

"I shall destroy this 'Hannah Montana'!"

Yeah, good luck with that, General Zod.

The survey provides an interesting glimpse into parenting styles and the children they produce, Queendom officials say in the press release.

"Research has shown quite clearly that parenting style can have a significant impact on a child's emotional health," Ilona Jerabek, the president of the company, says in the release.

"Children of authoritative parents tend to be the most socially well-adjusted and to have higher self-esteem," she adds. "Our study revealed that while most parents are happy about their relationship with their children, the least happy group tended to have more authoritarian parents themselves.

"In addition, those who viewed their children as being 'well-behaved' rather than 'mischievous' scored higher on Responsiveness and Team Parenting, and were firmer with their children."

The study also revealed:

· 8 percent of parents would rather give in to their children's desires than risk getting into an argument.
· 8 percent of parents felt that daycare is not appropriate for young children.
· 14 percent of parents want to feed only organic food to their children.
· 21 percent of parents believe that children should be sheltered from any exposure to injustice or others' bad behavior.
· 24 percent of parents consider themselves strict.
· 65 percent of parents will consult with their partner before administering a major punishment.
· 67 percent of parents like the idea of sitting around the dinner table and having their family discuss their day.
· 73 percent of parents said that they trust their children to make the right choices in life.
· 79 percent of parents believe in the old adage, "When you live under my roof, you will live by my rules."
· 91 percent of parents encourage self-expression and individuality in their children.

"The impact of parenting style on children is far-reaching," Jerabek says in the release. "This isn't to say that if a child has adjustment problems or delinquency problems in the future, it should be blamed solely on the parents. However, parents need to understand that from the very beginning, they will be setting the foundation for their children's future behavior and psychological health."

Or as Jor-El once put it, "The son becomes the father ... and the father, the son."

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Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.