Tonsils Connected to Bedwetting?

Filed under: In The News, Research Reveals: Toddlers & Preschoolers

tonsil bedwetting

If you remove a kid's tonsils and adenoids, he is less likely to wet the bed. Credit: Getty Images

OK, this gets kind of technical, but researchers have found a direct connection between tonsils and wee-wee.

Not poo-poo, mind you. Just wee-wee. Poo-poo remains one of life's great mysteries.

Researchers in Michigan have found if you remove a kid's tonsils and adenoids, he is less likely to wet the bed. No T&A jokes, please.

According to US News & World Report, kids with enlarged tonsils and adenoids are more likely to have sleep apnea (interruptions in breathing while sleeping), and kids with sleep apnea are more likely to bed their beds.

So, take away the tonsils and adenoids, and voila! You take away the bedwetting.

Exactly why kids with sleep apnea are more prone to wet the bed is unknown. Researchers expected hormones to be involved, but man was never meant to understand all the mysteries of wee-wee at once.

"If they haven't seen an ear, nose and throat specialist, see one to see if the child who wets the bed has OSA [obstructive sleep apena] that can be cured by tonsil or adenoid removal," study author Yegappan Lakshmanan, chief of pediatric urology at Children's Hospital of Michigan, tells US News & World Report.

Not all bedwetting is caused by sleep apnea, though, he adds.

"About 5 to 7 million children are bedwetters, and the causes fall into three main groups: bladder issues, sleep-related problems and the kidneys," he tells the magazine. "The children in this study wet the bed due to sleep-related problems."

Lakshmanan dreams of a world of dry sheets.

"Bedwetting is multifactorial even within these groups, and eventually we should be able to pinpoint the cause for every single child," he tells the magazine.

Maybe wee-wee will one day reveal all of its secrets after all.

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AdviceMama Says:
Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.