Minority Kids Spend More Time With Media, Study Shows

Filed under: In The News, Media

Minority kids ages 8 and older spend an average of 13 hours a day watching TV, listening to music, using the computer and playing video games. Credit: Getty Images

Minority kids in the United States spend more time in front of television and computer screens than white kids, according to research reported by U.S. News & World Report.

Researchers at Northwestern University tell the magazine minority kids ages 8 and older spend an average of 13 hours a day watching TV, listening to music, using the computer and playing video games. That compares with 4.5 hours among white kids.

Researchers analyzed data from previous studies done by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Among the specific findings:

  • TV: Black kids spend an average of five hours and 54 minutes a day watching TV. Hispanics spend five hours and 21 minutes. Asians spent four hours and 41 minutes. Whites spend three hours and 36 minutes.
  • Mobile Devices: Asians spend three hours seven minutes per day on mobile devices. Hispanics spend two hours and 53 minutes. Blacks spend two hours and 52 minutes. Whites spend an hour and 20 minutes.
  • Computers: Asians spend two hours and 53 minutes a day using computers for recreation. Hispanics spend one hour and 49 minutes. Blacks spend one hour and 24 minutes. Whites spend one hour and 17 minutes.
  • Use of Entertainment Media "Most of the Time" While Doing Homework: Blacks and Hispanics use entertainment media 35 percent of the time while doing homework. Asians use it 30 percent of the time. Whites use it 28 percent of the time.
  • Reading: Kids in all racial and ethnic groups spent 30 to 40 minutes a day reading for pleasure.
"In the past decade, the gap between minority and white youth's daily media use has doubled for blacks and quadrupled for Hispanics," the study's director, Ellen Wartella, who heads Northwestern's Center on Media and Human Development, tells U.S. News & World Report. "The big question is what these disparities mean for our children's health and education."

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