Bullies Grow up to be Abusive Husbands and Boyfriends, Study Finds

Filed under: In The News, Bullying, Research Reveals: Big Kids, Research Reveals: Teens

bullies

Guys who were bullies when they were kids are dramatically more likely to abuse their wives and girlfriends as adults. Credit: Getty Images

Your dinner date laughs as he reminisces about the time he stuffed the president of the chess club in his locker or made some fat kid cry.

"Good times, good times," he says as he wipes a nostalgic tear from his eye.

Careful. He may not be a nice guy.

ABC News reports guys who were bullies when they were kids are dramatically more likely to abuse their wives and girlfriends as adults.

A study, published this week in the journal Pediatrics, surveyed more than 1,400 men between that ages of 18 and 35 at an urban community center in Boston. ABC News reports researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health found former bullies were four times more likely to physically abuse their partners.

"Individuals who are likely to perpetrate abusive behaviors against others may do so across childhood into adulthood," the report concludes.

This is the latest study to find that many bullies do not outgrow their problems. ABC News reports past research shows bullies are more likely to bully their own kids, lose a job and get involved in the criminal justice system.

"We really need to look at the timing and duration on the type of bullying that occurs," the study's co-author Kathryn Falb, a research assistant and doctoral candidate at Harvard School of Public Health, tells ABC.

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Start by teaching him that it is safe to do so.